cotton

by curv.

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This sonic and increasingly spiritual viewpoint is echoed in some related new work from Kazan's Curv (Egor Rouds). His equally lo-fi ambient and drone textures are, just like Miru Water's instrumentals, inspired by the surrounding landscape. In fact one of the new Curv tracks is entitled (in lower case characters) "takemewoods." It's unclear whether a preposition ("to") is missing, or whether Rouds actually intends the woods to be actively "taking" their viewer off to some mysterious, unpredictable experience. One Russian blogger has referred to these same ambiguous sounds as "sticky-sounding, cyclical hip-hop with an unusual atmosphere and special effects."

Kazan is a city on the border between Russia's European and Asian territories, which is immediately evident from an architectural viewpoint, if nothing else. It's tempting to see that same address as home to a liminal worldview, balanced between self-assertion and the muffled lo-fi sounds of a timid soul, pondering his inclusion in some vaguely perceived, superior realm.

Since Rouds is not keen on his own promotional rhetoric, the worldview behind Curv is best investigated through the other lo-fi instrumentalists for which our musician expresses enthusiasm. First and foremost among them is the Tolyatti composer Vxlam, who is recommended as an exponent of "ambient, broken beats... which are themselves designed as the perfect accompaniment to an evening mood." The sense of slow acquisition to evening's passage is, apparently, cause for celebration. Modesty and humility have their (quiet) benefits.

As if to underscore that, Rouds on one occasion quotes a 1970 Joseph Brodsky poem in its entirety ("Ne vykhodi iz komnaty..."). The text is a series of imperatives directed towards some unnamed listener, imploring him/her not to leave the room in which they find themselves, but instead to "give freedom to the furniture and merge with the wallpaper." Inanimate objects offer the greatest insight into eternity; any sense of kinship with their faceless, nameless nature will also require a complete absence of ego.

© Far from Moscow (Los Angeles)

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released 26 July 2012

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